Accueil Series TV Spinning out GWAR Wants to Replace Lee Statue With Late Frontman Oderus Urungus

GWAR Wants to Replace Lee Statue With Late Frontman Oderus Urungus

As statues of Confederate Civil War veterans get torn down  by protesters or removed by official acts throughout the country, famed heavy metal provocateurs GWAR have decided to add a little fun to the ongoing protests by supporting a campaign to replace the statue of Robert E. Lee in Richmond, VA with one of their late frontman, Oderus Urungus.

For the uninitiated, GWAR has spent over 30 years dedicating itself to bad taste. Debuting in 1988, the band quickly became known for its over-the-top backstory as a band of aliens from Antarctica who travel the world in cartoonish outfits to throw concerts where they spray fake blood and other bodily fluids out into the crowd. Their shows are also known for ritual disembowelments of caricatures of famous figures, including every U.S. president from Reagan to Trump.

In real life, GWAR began in Richmond as an idea by musician Dave Brockie, who would take to the stage as intergalactic slaughterer Oderus Urungus while wearing a giant codpiece he called the Cuttlefish of Cthulhu. Over the years, Oderus became a popular figure among metal fans, appearing occasionally on Fox News’ “Red Eye” and even appearing in the horror sitcom “Holliston.” When Brockie died of a heroin overdose in 2014, thousands of fans gathered in Virginia for a Viking funeral which ended with the Oderus stage costume being lit on a funeral pyre.

So when GWAR discovered that their fans wanted to turn one of the nation’s most well-known Confederate statues into a tribute to Oderus, they jumped in. The band released a video of their drummer, JiZMak Da Gusha, arriving in Richmond to admire the graffiti that has covered the Robert E. Lee statue during the past three weeks of Black Lives Matter protests. He urged bystanders to sign a Change.org petition to replace Lee with a monument to Oderus in the state capital, which has received over 42,000 signatures as of writing.

“Robert E. Lee is a failed war general that supported a racist cause,” the petition states. “For too long, the city of Richmond has been displaying statues of him and other loser civil war veterans.”

“We the scumdogs of the universe call on the city of Richmond to erect a statue of great local leader Oderus Urungus in its place. While Oderus comes from the planet Scumdogia, he called Richmond his home, working with the local art community and employing local artists and ladies of the night.”

The petition also encourages GWAR fans to donate to the Richmond COVID-19 Arts and Culture Relief Fund, which has been providing financial relief to musicians and other artists who have had their income cut off due to closures from the COVID-19 pandemic.

As for the statue, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has ordered for the statue to be removed, but a lawsuit filed this past week by one of the descendants who signed over the land for the statue in 1890 has put a temporary hold on those plans. Meanwhile, the statue has become a gathering for residents to hold cookouts and public events, with LGBTQ+ activists projecting the pride flag on the statue this past weekend. One organizer told Vanity Fair that the protests are “bringing out the most diverse group of Richmonders we have ever seen.”

Now, those organizers can add aliens from Scumdogia to that diverse coalition.

Sports and Politics Don’t Mix? History Says Otherwise (Photos)

With President Donald Trump’s grousing over recent protests in the NFL, the debate over whether athletes should express their political views through the platform of sports has heated up once again. But contrary to what some might believe, the phenomenon of athletes protesting didn’t begin with Colin Kaepernick. Read on as TheWrap delves into the long-term relationship between sports and politics.

At the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Tommie Smith and John Carlos — who’d taken the gold and bronze medalists in the 200-meter dash — took to the winners podium and raised their fists above their heads in a silent protest against discrimination against African-Americans in the United States. « If I win I am an American, not a black American. But if I did something bad then they would say ‘a Negro.’ We are black and we are proud of being black, » Smith said of the protest.

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali famously refused to serve in the U.S. military during the Vietnam war, noting, “Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go ten thousand miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs? » In 2005, President George W. Bush awarded Ali the Presidential Medal of Freedom, calling him « a fierce fighter and a man of peace. »

Following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the United States led a boycott of the Summer Olympic Games in Moscow. The boycott would grow to 65 nations who refused to participate in the games.

Four years later, the USSR would return the favor, boycotting the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. « Chauvinistic sentiments and anti-Soviet hysteria are being whipped up in this country, » the Soviet government said of the boycott, which 13 other communist countries would also join.

At the beginning of the 1995-1996 NBA season, Denver Nuggets point guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf decided that he wouldn’t salute the American flag during the playing of the national anthem prior to games. The decision went unnoticed for some time; when NBA commissioner David Stern handed down a one-game suspension to the player. The NBA later reached a compromise, mandating that Abdul-Rauf stand for the anthem, but allowing him to close his eyes and face downward.

In 2014, following the death of Eric Garner after a confrontation with police in New York, Cleveland Cavaliers stars LeBron James and Kyrie Irving wore shirts emblazoned with the phrase « I Can’t Breathe » — Garner’s reported last words — while warming up for a game against the Brooklyn Nets. Nets players Jarrett Jack, Alan Anderson, Deron Williams and Kevin Garnett also donned the shirts.

In 2016, then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick opted not to stand during the national anthem, saying, « I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color … To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder. »

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From Muhammad Ali to Colin Kaepernick, a timeline of protesting athletes

With President Donald Trump’s grousing over recent protests in the NFL, the debate over whether athletes should express their political views through the platform of sports has heated up once again. But contrary to what some might believe, the phenomenon of athletes protesting didn’t begin with Colin Kaepernick. Read on as TheWrap delves into the long-term relationship between sports and politics.

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